Hi, I am Kathrin and I like the sweet side of life.
Here are some answers to your FAQs. If yours is not listed, feel free to ask it and I´ll be  happy to answer.

 

How did you become a photographer?

I studied Design at the University of Applied Sciences in Nuremberg, Germany with a focus on Photography.

I believe that photography techniques can be learnt by anyone and are not the most important part of taking a beautiful and interesting picture. I do like a picture telling a story taken with an iphone for sure better than a technically perfect, high definition, boring one.

 

Where did you become a pastry chef?

Before I studied photography and shortly after my graduation from school I started as a trainee in a 3 star restaurant to become a chef. It did not take me too long to throw in the towel and to realize that cutting potatoes into squares and producing food for people, that I do not even see when they eat, is not what I loved about cooking. (Being yelled at was sth. I could easily pass on, too.)

While studying photography however I soon realized that I missed the kitchen and my chequered cooking trousers and decided to move to Paris shortly after my diploma. I heard about this program at Ferrandi and was very happy to be able to participate in the Anglo Patisserie Programm. Together with a group of people from all over the world (Japan, Puerto Rico, England, Taiwan, India…) I learnt everything about french Pâtisserie: Tartes, Pâte à choux, Ice Cream, Entremets, Chocolates, Cakes, Petits Fours, Puff Pastry,  Baguette …. If you want to take a closer look you should see my Konditorentagebuch.
It was a spectacular, formidable, never forgetable time in Paris and I still think about it all the time.

 

How do you combine your two professions?

When I made all those good looking (and even better tasting) treats at school, of course, I was itching to take pictures of them as well. Also, when you live in Paris, it seems that on every corner there is sth inspiring that needs to be captured and shown to other people.
I realized that it was never the kitchen that I wanted, neither my photography, it would always be both…. This was the reason and time for me to start my blog Photisserie.

Still in France, I had some photography and styling requests, so when I came back to Germany, I decided to start working as a freelance photographer, one of the best decisions I have made so far.

Right now, almost all of my photography work is food related. I am very lucky that part of my job is to meet interesting and talented people, travel to beautiful places and of course, eat delicious food.

 

What camera and lenses do you use?

When I still lived in Paris I shot with a Nikon D200 (and two lenses: a 50/1.4 mm and a 35/1.8mm lens), all the pictures on the blog until the end of 2012 are taken with this camera. My Konditorentagebuch I shot with a Panasonic Lumix. It did a very well job (regarding all the chocolate, flour and sugar it had to handle with).

I now have switched to Fuji and I use a Fuji XT2 for most of my documentary work and and a medium Format GFX 50s for commercial shootings. When on vacation, I like to carry my little XT100

 

Do you teach photography, baking or styling classes?

No, not at the moment.

 

Do you sell your pastry anywhere?

No, not regularly. However, I am always open to special events like the ´Greenhouse Pop up Dinner` that I joined and made the dessert (a little Rhubarb Religieuse) for. Or the special christmas cookies I made for Hermès.

Contact me if you have anything beautiful in mind.